Sports injuryIn late May 2015, several athletes with foot problems made the national news. Perhaps you’ve heard about the one involving basketball star, Kyle Korver? During an Eastern Conference final against the Cleveland Cavaliers, he unfortunately sprained his right ankle. The 34-year-old pro is expected to spend some time off of the courts recovering. Of course that’s the kind of news that will likely dampen the mood of even the most optimistic Atlanta Hawks fans.

Over the years, much has been written about foot problems in sports and ankle sprains in particular. Studies have been conducted on the topic for decades too. One of the more recent ones was published in a January 2010 issue of The Journal of Family Practice. Although dated, it is in lock step with previous studies and makes a strong argument for the use of preventive medicine.

Podiatrists Recommend Being Proactive Regardless of Career Status

Preventive medicine has obviously come a long way since 2010. As such, athletes with foot problems have a variety of treatment options at their disposal. We’ve listed some, but not all of the treatment options below:

  • Temporary Cessation of Activity or Early Retirement
  • Use of Standard or High-Tech Orthotics
  • Proprioceptive Therapy or Training
  • Use of Special Athletic Shoes (Varies by Sport)
  • Physical Therapy
  • Use of Sports Tape and Specialty Braces
  • ROM and Strength Training Exercises

Of course the list of suggested treatments for athletes with foot problems will vary based on the types of injuries involved. Ankle sprains tend to be among the most common and insidious for athletes because of the potential for long-term effects. For example, athletes that sustain grade three ankle sprains are very likely to experience ligament weakness for extended periods of time. As such, their careers, not to mention their health, may take unexpected hits. To learn more about athletic related ankle injuries, please consult with a podiatrist.